My statistically-invalid filament test:

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rsilvers
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My statistically-invalid filament test:

Postby rsilvers » Sat Apr 04, 2015 6:05 pm

I just had to find out what would win a tug-o-war, so I printed these on my M2 with E3D hot end:

6 top and bottom. 4 perimeter. 0.15mm layers. 99% infill.

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:104868

And then pulled them apart.

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Since there is just one sample of each material, it is not statistically-valid. Ranked from best to worst:

GizmoDork black Polycarbonate (290C) $50 per KG
Polymaker Polymax (205C) $77.89 per KG
ColorFabb PLA-PHA (205C) $56.00 per KG
eSun PETG (yellow) (250C) $33.99 per KG
Taulman Tritan (275C) $90.00 per KG
ColorFabb XT (250C) $65.33 per KG
Octave ABS (230C) $31.00 per KG

Not tested yet:
Taulman 645 (245C) $70.40 per KG

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rsilvers
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Re: My statistically-invalid filament test:

Postby rsilvers » Sun Apr 05, 2015 5:15 pm

I got some GizmoDork black PC and was able to print it on my M2 with E3D at 290C with the bed heated to 110. I used Purple glue stick on bare glass, and had no warping or lifting. Print speed was 2400 and 0.15mm layers. 99% infill at 0, 90, 45, 135, 120, and 240 degrees. 6 top and bottom layers. 4 perimeters. The parts popped off when I rinsed cold water on the bottom of the glass.

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Two ABS beat one PC.
One PC beat one PolyMax.

$50 per KG. If this continues to print well, it will be a great material to have.

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rsilvers
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Re: My statistically-invalid filament test:

Postby rsilvers » Wed Apr 08, 2015 9:51 pm

I have had some issues with Polycarbonate not being very strong with layer bonding. It seems to be stronger with thinner layers, so I wanted to do Z-strength test.

I printed hexagonal rods and filled a bucket with water while supporting the bucket from the rods. When the rod broke, I turned off the water, and weighed it. The two strongest were the MakerGear PLA and the ColorFabb PLA-PHA. Both not only supported the bucket with 48 lbs of water in it, but I could even bounce it up and down. When doing so, the MakerGear broke. I was not able to break the PLA-PHA at all until I used pliers. I made up guesstimated weights for those, but the real value is probably higher for both. The lesson here is, if you want to print a part that will be stressed in a way that will try to separate layers, then PLA is king. If you want a part that pulls on the material, then PC is best, followed by PolyMax.

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